Madagascar Mojo

This black and white ruffed lemur was my buddy as long as I had some banana

This black and white ruffed lemur was my buddy as long as I had some banana

Our portable dental set-up worked pretty well

Our portable dental set-up worked pretty well

Pat and Richelle with a new eye glass fan

Pat and Richelle with a new eye glass fan

The director of the school, Richard, was a ping pong fan too

The director of the school, Richard, was a ping pong fan too

Weekend jungle lodge a few hours from the city

Weekend jungle lodge a few hours from the city

A two foot long chameleon eyes us warily

A two foot long chameleon eyes us warily

Ring tail lemurs looking for mischief

Ring tail lemurs looking for mischief

May 2014

Bonjour lemur fans,

            Pat and I signed up to be part of a Colorado Springs organized dental/vision project to Madagascar last month, and it was another adventure in third world travel. We hauled a dozen 50 pound bags of dental gear and donated eye glasses to take care of the kids and staff at a well run Street Kids Center in the capital city of Antananarivo, and were kept busy for a week and a half of eye exams and dental procedures. Pat enjoyed giving exams and dilating hundreds of kids eyes for Dr. Bob the ophthalmologist, while John, a dentist I shared an office with 30 years ago and I were engaged with pulling and filling teeth subjected to too much Coke and candy. The people we worked with were fabulous and everyone felt inspired by the smiles of the kids and their families. I even found out there was a ping pong table at the school, so spent some time routing the locals when I was done pulling teeth for the afternoon. I walked to the center each morning while the rest of the group chose to sit in stalled traffic, but they missed out on the essence of squalor and street sewage.

            One of my favorite aspects of the trip was the weekend getaway to a rain forest lodge to hang out with the wildlife and get to experience a setting where 80% of the animals are found no where else in the world. We hiked among the lemurs and chameleons, and even though Pat tried to avoid having a lemur land on her head she served as a nice vaulting horse for a few that wanted to get some banana from someone standing next to her. We stayed in a great house on church property and dined out a few times on French cuisine left from the colonization that ended in 1965. After our stint was completed we packed up and headed to the relative modern comfort of South Africa, but I’ll save that story for another email.

Cheers,

       Bob of lemur land