Canoeing and fireside flossing

Our Kevlar canoe made portaging seem like nothing more than  carrying a piano on your shoulders through a wooded, rocky trail

Our Kevlar canoe made portaging seem like nothing more than
carrying a piano on your shoulders through a wooded, rocky trail

 

Our leader, Ron, leading the way in his solo canoe

Our leader, Ron, leading the way in his solo canoe

 

The height of canoe fashion with waterproof knee high sealskinz socks and Tevas

The height of canoe fashion with waterproof knee high sealskinz socks and Tevas

 

The backcountry never saw such sparkling teeth by the campfire

The backcountry never saw such sparkling teeth by the campfire

Colorado hikers John and Dan ready to hit the watery trail

Colorado hikers John and Dan ready to hit the watery trail

 

One calm afternoon of mirror like reflections on the lake

One calm afternoon of mirror like reflections on the lake

 

Loons called out at night as we sat by the fire

Loons called out at night as we sat by the fire

Hail to canoe fans,

            Recently some of my hiking buddies invited me to join them on a Boundary Waters canoe adventure in the 1700 square mile, 1 million acre area in northern Minnesota that is famous for backcountry wilderness to get in touch with nature and sore shoulders. It was a rolling 2 day drive from Colorado to Ely, Minnesota, gateway to a universe of canoeing. It seemed that every car, truck, restaurant and shop was catering to canoeing and all the accessories you can imagine and some you can’t to make the backcountry experience unforgettable.

            Our hearty group of 6 paddled off for a six day adventure of paddling, portaging between lakes, and paddling some more to find scenic camping spots without the benefit of any signs or recognizable landmarks since the wilderness designation means you’re on your own. Actually the only sign we ever saw was a notice that the forest service was tagging wolves in the area which surprisingly didn’t register high on the safe and secure meter. A few of us tried to get lost in the dense woods but managed to make it back to our campsite before dark thereby denying the wolves a chance to practice their pack hunting tactics on a stray, clueless animal.

            I was even able to put my dental education to use when I convinced the unwashed members of my party to practice good dental hygiene around the campfire, and we flossed nightly before heading to the tents. It was a fitting prelude to a restful night’s sleep on the rocks and roots that somehow grow under the tent after it has been pitched on a seemingly flat, even surface. Overall a great trip with guy bonding 24/7, and the wind, cold and rain didn’t deter our spirits and kept the mosquitoes and black flies at bay. We stayed an extra night in Ely to indulge on the mouth watering walleye and fresh pie served up at the Chocolate Moose restaurant, and I noticed we walked out with an all knowing canoe swagger in our step as survivors of the Boundary Waters. To top it off, Pat joined me in Colorado a few days after my return to share the Indian summer weather with the aspens turning gold in the mountains. Hope your fall is shaping up and you’re ready for the next round.

Cheers,

        Boundary Waters veteran Bob